Portocolom

Porto Colom

The east coast village of Porto Colom – in the district of Felanitx – is one of the most attractive on this coast of Mallorca, and was named after Christopher Columbus. It’s a traditional fishing village, which gives it much of its charm. The village nestles around a large and irregular-shaped bay, where the boathouses, lighthouse and boats at anchor add to the picturesque nature of the place. There’s a long quay where pleasure craft mix with local fishing boats, and you can take boat trips from here too.

Even in the height of summer, there’s a tranquil air to Portocolom and parking isn’t usually a problem. Restaurants and cafés line the quayside – between them, offering everything from traditional Mallorcan to fine cuisine, at a range of prices. If you walk along the quayside, you’ll see plenty of evidence of the fishing trade – so you can expect to eat good seafood in the port. You should take time to wander over to Portocolom’s original heart on the opposite side of the harbour: the church is surrounded by attractive old pastel-painted cottages, some of which are now rather stylishly renovated.

Portocolom doesn’t have many shops but there are one or two interesting ones – mainly along the long quayside. One street back from the quayside is a parallel street selling the daily necessities for locals. For more serious shopping, there’s Felanitx (around 13 km from the port) or the more attractive town of Santanyí (some 18 km south). Felanitx has a lively market on Sunday mornings.

Golfers can enjoy panoramic views of Porto Colom and this stretch of coastline from the impressive Vall d’Or Golf, nearby on the road to S’Horta. The clubhouse is home to Máxime, a very good café/restaurant that’s also open to non-golfers.

Portocolom

Portocolom is the gem of the east coast of Mallorca.

Orient

Orient

The small hamlet of Orient is located on one side of the Puig de Alaró. The sheer beauty of the mountain scenery is reason enough to come here. Orient is also the starting point for a number of interesting hiking tours and a popular area for mountain bikers. The village itself has only 40 houses, around 20 regular inhabitants and three restaurants. Try Bar Restaurant Orient for the best suckling pig on the island or the French owned Mandala for excellent international cuisine in a very romantic setting.

Fornalutx

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If you stay by the coast you’ll never see it, but Fornalutx is regarded by many as the most beautiful village on Mallorca, and one of the most stunning in Spain. You’ll find it deep in the Sierra de Tramuntana, with winding streets, narrow stone steps, and flowers and greenery everywhere. Its houses are decorated with colourful painted tiles, some dating back to the 16th century.

Fornalutx

Known as the ‘Prettiest village in Spain’, with narrow, cobbled streets it is certainly worth a visit. Four hotels and a few cafes, it is a quiet spot in the Tramuntana and close to Sóller. […] Fornalutx

San Telmo

San Telmo

Where the mountains meet the sea, less than ten minutes west of Puerto Andratx, you’ll find San Telmo, or Sant Elm, a simple fishing village where the fishermen’s houses line the sea’s edge. It’s protected a few hundred metres offshore by the island of La Dragonera, declared a nature reserve in 1985. You may never want to leave.

San Telmo

This small pretty beach front and fishing port village with a backdrop of the Tramuntana mountains and the island of Dragonera just infront it is a low key resort on the southwest coast with a lot to offer! […] San Telmo

Cala Figuera

Cala Figuera

The picturesque harbour is only a few kilometres away from Santanyíand the romantic and Meditarranean feeling is hard to match. Here you will get an authentic idea of what the island was like before the times of mass tourism. Or do you prefer secluded walks? If so, you have the choice between the nature resort of Mondragó (follow signs on the road from Santanyí to Cala Figuera) or drive through Es Llombards to the saltfields of Ses Salines.

 

 

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